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20110704
20110704
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
in america. verizon. built so you can rule the air. now powering the lg revolution. >>> afghanistan could once again become a haven for al-qaeda should the taliban ever return to power there. that is according to the top u.s. commander in afghanistan general david petraeus. as you may know, later this month general petraeus will be stepping down from his role to head the cia and in an interview with fox the general said the military has had a lot of success eradicating militants but cautioned that the job is not over. >> that task has been accomplished but, of course, it is threatened because, of course, the taliban allowed al-qaeda on afghan soil when it ran the country and we believe that there is a high likelihood that that would happen again. >> the general has also said that the military focus will soon shift from taliban strongholds to the boarder with pakistan. >>> capture or kill. that reportedly is the question the obama administration is internally debating when it comes to what to do about wanted terrorists. we all know capturing suspects in the mountains of pakistan or in yeme
" reported last year by jason carroll. he's back in afghanistan with one of those soldiers, sergeant randy shorter. >> sergeant shorter was part of the surge who arrived last august. his one-year mission is nearly complete. jason is live from shirr rana in the northeastern part of afghanistan. happy fourth of july to you, nice to see you. >> and happy fourth of july to you. i'm going to bring in randy shorter right now. i have to tell you, we now have to refer to him as first sergeant randy shorter because he's since been promoted since the last time the two of us were together. let me bring you in here now. tell us about, what was it september, august, the last time i was with you guys? >> tell me what the past several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotio
down more or less, and native indians in brazil, even in afghanistan, they call the areas where they are doing all the bombing, they are tribal areas, and i wondered if you could just speak to the fact that indigenous people all over the world are under attack, and is there some way that we can get this out into the press so understand that this should be stopped immediately. >> guest: well, what you're saying is true. i was just in norway, and i did a performance with asami person and a woman from india. she's a naga, that's the name of their indigenous nation under attack by the burmese, and i think what it is is there's always the land hunger, the need -- taking over for land, and the indoing nows people are -- indigenous people are vulnerable because they're in isolated areas or places they were sent that suddenly have resources available that others want. for instance, chevron has in, i think, it's costa rica has just covered the people, the land, the water, and the animals in oil so what we think about is the oil in the gulf, but we don't realize that that's happening in o
-- vietnam, iraq, afghanistan -- is that they are fought mostly by the poor. there are very, very few among the dead and wounded in the those three wars who have been sons or daughters of ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite in the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the air strock rah si to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries, they're there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army, you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland. and so, therefore, officering the army was something that was generally reserved for people in the upper classes. this meant that when these countries went to war in 1914, these upper classes suffered an enormous toll. for examp
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)